Tag Archives: McGeary

Thanksgiving Memories & Looking Forward to December

Let’s take a look back at Thursday November 29, 1883 — Thanksgiving Day. Should have done this a couple of weeks ago…better late than never!

McDermott Store Ledger - November 29, 1883

Well, I suppose Thanksgiving Day is as good a day as any to buy a new pair of overalls, Patrick Langan.

I wonder what Thanksgiving was like for the pioneer settlers of Clontarf in 1883? Would they have killed a wild turkey for dinner? I don’t think I saw any turkeys being purchased at McDermott’s leading up to the big day. Maybe they had pheasant instead?

Alas, Thanksgiving is but a memory to us now. Time to look forward to December and the Christmas holiday. I wonder how soon the residents of Clontarf begin their Christmas shopping?

McDermott Store Ledger - December 1, 1883

Looks like Mr. McDermott is paying bills on this first day of the month. Rent is $5 per month. It could take him a few days to make that back in any given month!

What is the final entry for James Flynn all about? I can’t quite make it out.

On a sad note, Austin McGeary of Danvers passed away last Thursday, December 1st. I met Austin and his wife several years ago. My mom and I learned that Austin had boarded with my great-grandfather Neil Regan in Clontarf while he worked at Perrizo’s store in the late 1930s. Austin shared his memories of the time he spent at Neil’s as a young man, and for that we are very grateful.

Read Austin’s obituary here: http://www.wctrib.com/event/obituary/id/87235/. Our thoughts are with the entire McGeary family.

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July @ McDermott General Store

Come on…somebody’s got to have something to say about Mystery Photo #6!  Here is a hint: this tiled floor appeared in a much-beloved and sorely missed Clontarf establishment.  Leave a comment and let me know your answer!  The first correct answer wins a Clontarf Prairie Pub T-shirt.  What are you waiting for?

It has been a while since we have taken a look at Mr. McDermott’s ledger.  I wonder what the folks of Clontarf were buying in the Summer of 1883?

On July 4th James Shea outfitted himself with a new pair of overalls for 90-cents, two pair socks for 35-cents, and a pair of suspenders for 40-cents.  John Schinnick was also in the market for new togs, picking up a linen shirt for $1.

A descendant of Timothy Galvin commented on the blog recently.  Her great-great-grandfather stopped in on July 13th for a few supplies: 1/2 gallon lard oil, yeast cakes, matches, and one fence board – all for 90-cents.

I hope that Mrs. James McGary (McGeary?) was O.K. with a 55-cent charge on her account July 30th.  One pound of chewing tobacco went “to her boy”.

We will check back with the ledger in August…

 

 

 

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Altar Boys Identified and Shopping in Clontarf

Altar Boys

No one had anything to say about the altar boy photo from last time, so here it is again, this time with most of the boys identified…

St. Malachy Altar Boys 1920

Father Patrick Kenney at very back

Back row: Melvin Klucas, unknown, Howard Regan, Robert Reardon (between two rows)

Middle row: Lewis Fennell, Clarence Hargreaves

Front row: ? Flynn, Donald Reynolds, Richard McMahon

We are only missing the identity of the boy second from the left in the back row, and the first name of the Flynn boy in the front.  Any ideas?

From what I have heard, Father Kenney was a popular priest in Clontarf.  Any stories about him?  Please share by leaving a comment/reply.

McDermott General Store: November 1883

Just have a couple of pages from the November 1883 store ledger.  Let’s see what who was shopping…

November 5th

  • Priest Safleur: $2.15 for coffee, tea, sugar, and two stove pipes (.40)
  • John Gallagher: stocked up on some staples, including tea, coffee, matches, soap, nails, tobacco and then came back a bit later for 5 yards of denim (.60) and 4 skein of yarn (.48)
  • John Regan:  sold Mr. McDermott $4.05 worth of butter and received cash back
  • Mrs. James McGeary: lantern globe (.20), 2 yards blue denim (.40), 2 yards shirting (.28), 3 yards sheeting (.27), and thread (.05)
  • James Kent: sugar (1.00) and can of tea (.65)
  • William Duggan: 8 yards sheeting (.80), 3-1/2 yards flannel (.63), thread (.05), pins (.05), and elastic (.05)

November 8th

  • Mrs. John Casey: sugar (.50), 2# currants (.20), matches (.10), salt (.10), and nails (.10)
  • Industrial School: 4 dozen eggs (.80)
  • John Regan: sugar (1.00), kerosene oil (.30), Japanese tea (.45), 5# nails (.25), 4# prunes (.40)
  • John Regan, put on James Kent’s account: 2# nails (.10)

McDermott paid out about 12-1/2 cents per dozen eggs (see earlier post) and it looks like he charged the folks at the Industrial School 20-cents per dozen.

A fair amount of sewing would be done by Mrs. McGeary and Mrs. Duggan.  I didn’t realize elastic had been invented by 1883.  What do you suppose Mrs. Duggan was making with all that sheeting?

Anything stand out to you about these purchases?

 

I will get back to the family histories in upcoming posts.  Let me know if you have any suggestions for information you would like featured on the blog.

 

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Odds and Ends

I would like to share some feedback I have received on a couple of recent posts:

First Communion Photo

Jackie Byrne Doherty and Alice Molony Bird have been pondering the 1929 First Communion photo I posted on October 20th.  They have identified Alice’s father, Leo Molony, as the altar boy holding the cross, and they believe the other altar boy to be Leo Cameron.

Jackie and Alice don’t think this photo is of the 1929 First Communion, because they are unable to locate Kathryn Molony (name misspelled on Church listing) – they have a photo of Kit’s First Communion, so they know who they are looking for!

Please take another look at the photo (click on it to enlarge) and let me know if you recognize any of the children…maybe we can get the correct date.  I was wondering if this could this be a Confirmation group? That would make a bit more sense for the number of people in the group, since by the 1920s, the First Communion groups were becoming rather small.  In 1928, there were only eight: Donal Regan, Edward Daniel, Rose Reardon, Catherine Perrizo, Dorothy Langan, Anna Mae Mikkelson, Bernice Daniel, and Dorothy Hargreaves.  The next time there was a First Communion at St. Malachy’s was 1931 when 38 children were in the group.  Take a look and see if anyone looks familiar…

McDermott General Store Ledger

Margo Ascheman was doing exactly what I do when I look at the pages from the store ledger – trying to match people up to her family tree.

She was interested in the family of frequent shopper Francis McMahon.  He was my great-great-grandfather who came from County Fermanagh, Ireland in 1856.  He settled initially in the Red Wing, MN area, but married Catherine McAndrew from the Ellsworth, WI area.  There were some McMahons in Wisconsin.  Margo’s great-grandfather McGeary married Bridget McMaha(o)n in Monchas, Wisconsin.  Not sure if that is near Ellsworth…need to do a bit more digging on that…

Does anyone have any information on the Galvin family?  Margo, where did Maurice and his wife live?

Now for something new…

I was looking through some obituary clippings I had received from Marlys at the Swift County Historical Society, and I found this tidbit (sorry it is crooked):

Swift County News May 18, 1922

Maybe Margo can tell us how this McGeary is related to her?  Sad news from the Gossons as well.

No one guessed who bought the broom suspiciously close to Halloween in 1883.  You still have time to compile some entries in the September/October drawing.  Every comment is an entry in a drawing for an official Clontarf Prairie Pub T-Shirt!  There will be two winners announced early next week…

Happy Halloween everyone!  Oh, if you have any memories from Halloween in Clontarf, share them!  I bet you guys had  some tricks up your sleeves…

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Hughes Family Part II: John & Mary McGeary Hughes

The Hughes story continues…

John Hughes married Mary McGeary of Marysland Township in 1898.  They had 10 children: Anthony, William, John, Mary, Rose, Joseph, Anne, Janet, Agnes and Florence.  Anne Hughes and Rose Hughes Perrizo live in Clontarf and Janet Hughes Strand lives in Benson.  The four sons are deceased and Mary, Agnes, and Florence live in California.

John Hughes was a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians.  He hauled rocks from his farm for the foundation of the present church of St. Malachy and also helped in the building of the A.O.H. Hall.

I was cross-referencing with the Swift County History book and it looks like the McGeary family from Marysland came from County Tyrone, Ireland, as did the Hughes family.  I also noted that Patrick McGeary married Mary Hughes, daughter of Cornelius and Catherine (Dunn) Hughes.  If anyone is interested, we can look further into it.

Remember…every time you comment or reply to a comment on the blog, your name is entered in a drawing to win a special Clontarf prize!  The drawing takes place at the end of the month, so you have less than a week to build your entries.

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