Tag Archives: hay

Father Oster in Action

My mom reminded me of a photo she found at the Archdiocese Archives in Saint Paul, Minnesota…

Oster on the Farm, no date (courtesy of Archdiocese Archives - Saint Paul, MN)

Oster is the one with the beard. Does anyone recognize the two gentlemen and the boy baling hay with Father?

Note to Jim: I forgot about Shannon’s book – I do have a copy.  I need to look at his bibliography again. I still would love to find some sort of advertisement for the settlement at Clontarf.

 

Happy New Year to everyone!

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The Boutain Family & Clontarf’s “Hay Day”

This history appeared in the Clontarf anniversary booklet from 1978.  It contains a great story about when it was all about hay in Clontarf.

Edward Boutain, Sr. Family History

Edward Sr. was born in 1852 in Quebec Province, Canada.  He married Belsimire Mercier and came to Clontarf in 1900.  The family operated the Clontarf Hotel with their sons helping with the livery stable while the daughters worked in the restaurant.  The children born to Edward Boutain, Sr. and Belsimire were: Delvina, Georgiana, Thomas, Edward Jr. who married Mary O’Brien (Leona, William, Maire, Lucille, and Edward), Rosie, Leona, Clara, and Annie.

Edward Boutain, Jr. and his brother Thomas were engaged in the hay business at Clontarf during the early 1900s when Clontarf was the Hay Capital of the World.  Leona remembers how the farmers would squabble (fight) for the railroad cars as they came into Clontarf to pick up hay with many farmers running out to meet the train as it neared Clontarf – and climbing into the cars while on the move to claim them for their hay.

Everyone in Clontarf during this time was involved in the hay business.  If you weren’t growing hay, then you were buying and selling it.  I am sure my great-grandfather was not the only one in Clontarf to lose the “fortune” he made in hay nearly as quick as he made it.

I think I have mentioned before that we have quite a large collection of photographs which roughly date from 1900-1910.  Most of the photographs are formal and feature men and women who are well-groomed and in their Sunday best, bright-eyed and ready for the camera.  But there are a couple of the photos where the mood is much more relaxed – hats are askew, suits are  sloppy, and posture is slouched.  I have a hunch that it isn’t a coincidence that these are all-male group photos.  We have heard plenty of stories of farmers who went into town after a good harvest or market and didn’t come home for a week…maybe they stopped off at Brandmo’s for a photo so they would remember it when the week was up?

The man seated on the left is my great-grandmother’s brother Tim Foley, and the man standing on the right is my great-grandfather’s brother Jack Regan.  I am not sure about the other two guys.  Maybe they are Boutains?  Any guesses?

I’ve always kind of liked this one.

Four Guys from Clontarf

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Bruno J. Perrizo: Renaissance Man of Clontarf

Mr. Bruno J. Perrizo certainly was a busy man!  This excerpt is from the 100th Anniversary booklet:

Bruno J. Perrizo was born in Delavan, Minnesota in 1868. He was married to Miss Melinda Litterneau in Delavan in 1889 and came to Clontarf in 1903. After conducting a land office in Clontarf for two years, the family moved to Hancock where B. J. Perrizo operated a saloon for the next six years. In 1911 the Perrizo family returned to Clontarf where B. J. Perrizo entered the hay business and operated a saloon until 1917. In 1912 B. J. Perrizo and his nephew, Wm. J. Perrizo, organized the Farmers State Bank of Clontarf with B. J. Perrizo as President and Wm. J. Perrizo as Cashier. The bank was sold to the First State Bank Stock Corporation in 1931.

B. J. Perrizo operated a stock and dairy farm in the Clontarf area for a quarter of a century. He was also a livesock buyer for a number of years prior to the organizaiton of the Clontarf Shipping Association. In 1933 he opened a cafe and beer parlor in the Clontarf bank building. He was a great lover of horses and raised blooded stock for several years; he raced some of his horses in Canada.

There were six children in the Perrizo family: Della, Belle, Roy, Hazel, Archie, and Winifred. Belle Perrizo Fiala operated the cafe for several years after B. J. Perrizo’s death in 1938.

You were correct Jackie!  Mystery Photo #3 is the old Clontarf bank building.  Thanks for the history of the building after it was used for the bank.  You can read her comments here.

Anyone know when the bank was torn down?  Any memories of the building, in any of its incarnations?

Only a couple of days left to build your entries in the Clontarf Prairie Pub T-shirt drawing!  Just leave a comment or a reply and you will be automatically entered.

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