Tag Archives: Annie Hill

Happy Birthday to you…

Annie Hill Regan

My great-grandmother Annie Hill Regan was born on August 30, 1875 near Kill, County Kildare, Ireland. Read my latest article on Annie in the August issue of Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy Magazine…click here to view the magazine. Mail-order Mystery is near the back. I continue Annie’s story in the September issue out on September 4th. Online magazines are available free of charge on Irish Lives Remembered – a fantastic genealogy site. Check it out.

This is a postcard Annie received from the Ladies Auxilary of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in 1901. I imagine that many of the ladies of Clontarf received this same postcard. Has anyone seen this type of item before? What about similar communications from the Ancient Order of Hibernians to the male membership?

Happy Birthday Annie!

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Remembering Julia

Julia Duggan Regan passed away 35 years ago today, February 22nd.

Julia was born on the Duggan family farm in Tara Township on July 15, 1885. She was baptized on August 2nd at St. Malachy Catholic Church in Clontarf, with James Kenna and Margaret Duggan as sponsors.  Julia was the youngest child of William and Julia (Creedan) Duggan. The Duggans were among the pioneer Irish settlers of Tara Township who traveled west from Concord, New Hampshire in response to Bishop John Ireland’s Catholic colonization efforts.

Over the past eight years, I have had the pleasure to get to know two of Julia’s sons, Donald and Gerald Regan. Donald and Gerald have shared many stories of growing up in Clontarf. Individually, their memories are sharp, but when you get them together, the brothers play off of one another’s recollections, with amazing results. Without Donald and Gerald I never would have gotten to know my great-grandmother (and their aunt) Annie Hill Regan (click here to read what I learned about Annie.)

From what I have heard about Julia, she was practical, hardworking, and devoted to her children. For all intents and purposes, Julia raised her seven children on her own, and it was an ongoing struggle to provide for the family. But with determination and resourcefulness, Julia did just that…and more. Julia wanted the best for her children, and did what was necessary to provide them with every opportunity. Her children were educated, served in the military, became teachers, and a mayor. Gerald got his start in a railroad career in part on account of his beautiful penmanship – that surely is a sign of a good mother!

Julia was always trying to improve her home, make it more efficient and more comfortable. Apparently, Julia could not bear to see a good outbuilding go to waste and sent Donald and Gerald out to rescue countless unused structures from family and neighbors in the area. Julia had vision – her brother’s old chicken coop would make a perfect garage and that shed from her parent’s place in Tara would be the ideal addition to the hay barn. Like the good sons they were, Donald and Gerald carried out her plans, moving the buildings and setting them up for their new purpose at Julia’s.

Julia Duggan Regan

And to top it off, Julia made delicious doughnuts. I would say she was quite a woman!

Her grandson John Conroy of Hancock has shared a number of historical items with my mom and me over the years. Julia’s older sister Catherine had put together a fantastic postcard collection and a photo album. Most of the people in the album are unknown to me, but there are some great photographs I assume are of Catherine’s sisters and friends. Like this one…

Duggan Family Album, courtesy of John Conroy

The woman on the right resembles Nell Regan (Julia’s future sister-in-law) and the other two could be Margaret and Catherine Duggan. The only photo with anything written on the back is of my great-grandmother’s brother. It says, “To Kate”.

Tim Foley, courtesy of John Conroy

But of all the photographs in this collection, my favorite is a little snapshot that was tucked at the back of the album.

Donald and his sister Kathryn, courtesy of John Conroy

Take a minute today to remember Julia, and if you live in the Clontarf area, you might just run into someone who could tell you a thing or two about the woman who made Clontarf her home for over seventy years.

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She Liked Nice Things

Annie, ca. 1900

Until my mom and I began researching our family history in 2004, this was about all I knew of my great-grandmother Annie Hill Regan – she liked nice things.  And we wouldn’t have learned much more if it wasn’t for Donald and Gerald Regan.  Donald and Gerald are Clontarf natives who grew up across the railroad tracks from Annie, her husband Neil, and my grandpa John.  Over the past seven years, Donald and Gerald have shared their memories of life in Clontarf.  Working as a team, one brother fills in the blanks when the other can’t quite recall a name or detail.  They are really quite remarkable, and their memories are a treasure!

In the August/September 2011 issue of Irish America magazine, I wrote about how we learned about Annie, guided by our chats with Donald and Gerald.  Click here to read the article online.

Here are the two photos I mention in the piece:

Annie Hill and Cornelius Regan, wedding -- 1911

Neil, Annie, and John Regan -- 1915

Perhaps there is a mysterious figure in your family tree?  Sometimes it just takes a little bit of digging, but you can uncover the story behind the mystery.  In our case, talking to people who knew Annie along with researching census returns, church records, newspapers, and other public documents helped us answer questions we thought would remain unanswered forever.  A little luck never hurt, either!

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Mystery Photo #4

On warm Sunday afternoons, what do most of us like to do?  Go to the lake, play with the kids, have a picnic, relax with family and friends…

A little bit of all of that is going on in this Mystery Photo, except for the going to the lake part – unless Byrne “Lake” or “Lake” Malachy counts.*

Mystery Photo #4

Do any of these people look familiar to you?  Click on the photo to make it larger.  I believe this photo was taken in 1918, could be Tara Township or Clontarf.  Actually, I suppose it could be almost anywhere.

The woman on the far left is my great-grandmother Annie Hill Regan, standing behind her in the vest is great-grandfather Neil Regan, and in the front on the left is my grandfather John (“Red” as he was known in Clontarf) Regan.

Any ideas? Something to ponder over the weekend…

*Byrne Lake and Lake Malachy show up on Plat maps, although their existences can’t be proven.

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Ladies of Clontarf

A photograph with Reardon connections:

Clontarf - 1920s

The caption reads, “Mrs. McCrystal, Katie Reardon, and Auntie”.  Mrs. McCrystal was the wife of the school superintendant and Auntie was Annie Hill Regan.  This is another photograph from an album that belonged to one of Annie’s nieces from Montana.

Anybody know anything about Katie Reardon?

This photo is from the 1920s, I suspect.

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