Going, Going, Gone!

Conlogue Family (courtesy of Leo Holl)

Ellen Kenna married Michael Conlogue on February 16, 1886 at St. Malachy Catholic Church in Clontarf.  Ellen was born in Concord, New Hampshire on June 2, 1863 and moved to Tara Township with her family in the late 1870s.  Michael Conlogue was born in Ontario, Canada in 1856 and came to America in 1884.

Ellen and Michael met while Ellen was staying with an aunt in Lakeville, Minnesota, studying to be a teacher.  The couple purchased a farm in the northwest quarter of section 14 in Tara Township, and they farmed there until Michael’s death in 1922.  Ellen sold the farm in 1923.  The following auction notice appeared in the Swift County Monitor.  It is fascinating to see the items for sale at this auction – the notice serves as an inventory of the contents of the Conlogue farm, but we can assume many other farms in the area would have had similar components.

Conlogue Auction, Tara Township 1923 (courtesy of Leo Holl)

Click to enlarge

Thanks to Leo Holl, a descendant of Michael Conlogue and Ellen Kenna, for providing the photo and auction notice!

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15 Comments

Filed under Family Histories, Tara Township

15 responses to “Going, Going, Gone!

  1. Jim Egeland

    Thank you for sharing Kenna ancestry.

  2. Anne Schirmer

    Thank you! I also have a sale bill from the auction when my father passed away in April 1970 and it most certainly does inventory the farm. It is a isvery sentimental piece of paper. It brings tears to the eyes as one thinks of all the changes that happened because dad died “before his time” when he was in good health, but by the stroke of bad luck got caught in the PTO and was unable to break away (PowerTake Off is part of the tractor). And so, life changes, decisions have to be made, and the auction bill is a testiment to that change…going, going, gone!

  3. Anne Schirmer

    I meant to included the fact that our farm in Tara Township would be just north one mile from the Conlogues, I believe, but my mother and father (Ray & Esther Ollendick) didn’t move here till the fall of 1947.

  4. Anne Schirmer

    Also, interesting to note that it was the Farmer State Bank of Clontarf that clerked the auction…

  5. Anne Schirmer

    I’ve been told that Kenna is pronounced ken-NAW.
    But I’ve never been sure how to pronounce Conlogue…

    I’m not Irish.

  6. Margo McGeary Ascheman

    Help me as I not able to send notes… Why Margo

  7. Jim Egeland

    re: Kenna pronunciation.
    I emailed Don Kenna, a descendant of John Edward Kenna Jr. This is his reply:
    Donald Kenna7:23pm May 7th
    Re: Kenna pronunciation
    we say ken na
    some cousins say ken naw, but most say ken na.
    think ours came from an old irish priest who said it the long way/
    but call us what you want as long as its not late for dinner.

  8. Pingback: What’s the gift for a 126th wedding anniversary? | History of Clontarf, Minnesota

  9. Don Coy

    My mother Helen Kenna, one of 10 children born to Margaret Kent & William Kenna of Tara Township. We were Coys of Danvers. Their homestead was SW of the intersection kittycorner from Matt & Margaret Langan.

    The name is pronounced Ken-naw or naugh.

    Don Coy.

    • Jim Egeland

      Hi Don, I am from Jane Irene Kenna Shea line. I am trying to find someone in the Kenna family who has all the records that Don Kenna & Dick Coy & Fr. Kenna developed on the history of the Kenna family. All three of these men corresponded with my mother (Dorothy Nuxoll Egeland) in the 60’s-90’s. I have some genealogy but not all of the materials & pictures they had…please contact me. Jim Egeland jimfromoz@gmail.com

  10. Christine K. Fox

    I have formerly sent information to your site regarding the Shea family who married into the Tierney family in Butte, Montana.
    I just noticed that the name of Mcmahon is mentioned on your site also.
    My Tierney family also was related to the Mcmahons as well.
    Wondering now if there were any Murphy ‘s around?

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